Monday, May 9, 2016

Simply Strippy Sewing Kit & The Next Big Thing

Simply Strippy Sewing Kit from Scrap Happy Sewing

This project has been on my Must Make list for a while now. Scrap Happy Sewing by Kim Kruzich (also known as Retro Mama) is full of adorable projects to make with your leftover bits of fabric happiness. You know that I can never refuse another sewing kit, and the Simply Strippy version is adorable.

Simply Strippy Sewing Kit from Scrap Happy Sewing

Most of the patchwork pieces for this kit came from my scrap bins, though I tossed in a few pieces of Foxglove by Aneela Hoey which came in my last fabric package -- such a beautiful collection. I added some Art Gallery Fabric denim in Adobe Clay for the inner pockets as well as an extra pocket using more Foxglove.

Simply Strippy Sewing Kit from Scrap Happy Sewing

This little kit was so fun to make and a really fast sew -- about two hours of sewing in between afternoon errands and dinner with the family.

Simply Strippy Sewing Kit from Scrap Happy Sewing

The next big project on my list is setting up a sewing station for my three daughters who are finally getting their own machine. It's exciting and yes, just a little bit scary to think about how quickly they're growing up. My oldest turned 9 in February, and she's been begging for this privilege for at least a year. I'm taking a deep breath, stocking up on band-aids, and getting ready to become Sewing Teacher Extraordinaire this summer. Because as I spent a bit of time thinking about this whole motherhood thing during the big day yesterday, I realized that doing all that we do to take care of our kids -- while exhausting and overwhelming -- is really not the hardest part of our job. The hardest part is teaching them to be independent enough not to need us so much anymore. This stage has been quietly creeping up on me this year, and though I've never considered myself a control freak, I'm learning that it's not easy to let go. No, my girls aren't headed off to college for almost a decade yet, but now is the time to teach them that there are already things they can do for themselves. Things like folding their own laundry and helping with dinner, studying for tests and sewing birthday gifts for friends, knowing what they believe and standing up for what's right. If they can tuck these things away now, I know they'll be habits by the time they're ready to fly off on their own wings.

So yes, it's time to let my girls learn how to use a sewing machine all by themselves. And I'm excited and nervous and a just a wee bit emotional.

And so proud I can hardly stand it.

8 comments:

  1. Sweet pouch and your girls will love you even more for giving them the skills to create beautiful things just like their mom!

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  2. Hej Heidi, this pouch is so sweet! i love your creations! greetings from denmark Ulrike :0)

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  3. Seriously! The hardest words out of my mouth are "ok, YOU do it and I'll just watch"! And I only have to do it with ONE! Love the sewing pouch - going to check out the book. Love al the adorable little projects you share :-)

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  4. What a sweet little sewing kit! Love the happy colors! Your girls will thank you in the end for making them stronger, independent people. No doubt you have and will continue shaping them into amazing ladies. Just keep having fun along the way. From my point of view they seem to be pretty lucky girls!!

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  5. Someone recently told me that my role as a Mother = Life Coach. And how right they are! I am not very good at letting go either, because it is often quicker and easier to do it for them, but my husband leads the way with setting good examples all the time and it reminds me that I need to do this!

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  6. Gorgeous, thanks for sharing, I need one of these.......

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  7. You are a wonderful sewist, love your sweet pouch, and a wise Mother!!! :D

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  8. Great job on getting your children to sew while still early and before they develop the 'fear' of sewing.
    I taught sewing lessons for children age 6 and up for 10 years, 4 students per class, each was set up with their own machine. They started on the machine from the first class, right after learning how to turn the sewing machine on. The projects were clothing for themselves, they were so proud to wear their own creations.
    The classes also had boys and teens, even a young mom who had never learned to sew but really wanted to sew things for her baby.
    I found the age of 9 - 10 was the best age to start because their fine motor skills were quite developed and they had developed the ability to read well and understand which came in handy when reading the step-by-step instructions on commercial patterns.
    Good luck, it brings back fond memories :)

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Aren't you the sweetest!! Thanks for making my day by leaving a comment!

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